Welcome to Central Alabama Radiation Oncology

Thank you for choosing the Central Alabama Radiation Oncology, LLC for your health care services. We are committed to providing world-class care and would like to make your visit with us as pleasant as possible. In this section, you will find information to help make your treatment process at CARO seamless one. We have included instructions on what information you will need for your first visit, patient forms, frequently asked questions, HIPPA and Privacy, and a link to the patient portal where you can fill out your new patient forms online. If there are other questions that we can address, please give us a call at (334) 395-2200 or email us at info@carollc.com.

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COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

The term ‘immune compromised’ refers to individuals whose immune system is considered weaker, more impaired, or less robust than that of the average healthy adult. The primary role of the immune system is to help fight off infection. Individuals with compromised immune systems are at a higher risk of getting infections, including viral infections such as COVID-19. There are many reasons that a person might be immune compromised: health conditions such as cancer, diabetes, or heart disease, older age, or lifestyle choices such as smoking can all contribute to weakened immune systems. Patients with cancer may be at greater risk of being immune compromised depending on the type of cancer they have, the type of treatment they receive, other health conditions, and their age. The risk of being immune compromised is typically highest during the time of active cancer treatment, such as during treatment with chemotherapy. There is no specific test to determine if a person is immune compromised, although findings such as low white blood cell counts or low levels of antibodies (also called immunoglobulins) in the blood likely indicate an immune compromised state.

source: cancer.net

It appears that patients with cancer and survivors of cancer may be at higher risk of health complications from COVID-19. This is not surprising given that this group of individuals is often immune compromised. There is emerging evidence that patients with hematological malignancies, including leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, may be a greater risk of infection and complications than patients with other cancer diagnoses. There is also evidence that patients with progressing cancer when they are diagnosed with COVID-19 may be at higher risk of death or serious health complications compared with those with disease in remission.

source: cancer.net

To date, limited evidence is available to suggest that any cancer treatments raise your risk for getting COVID-19 any more or less than anyone else who is exposed to the virus. There is some evidence that patients with cancer may experience more serious COVID-19 infection if they acquire it, likely because cancer and cancer treatment can contribute to weakened immune systems which can then lead to a reduced ability to fight off infections. Emerging evidence suggests that patients with lung cancer who received chemotherapy within 3 months of a COVID-19 diagnosis are at higher risk of dying from the infection. Patients who are getting treatment for cancer also interact with the health care system more frequently than the general population, so more exposure in that setting may contribute to a higher risk of getting an infection, but that is not known with certainty at this point. Patients are advised to speak with their cancer care team about whether non-essential clinic visits can be skipped, re-scheduled, or conducted by telephone or videoconferencing. Keep in mind, however, that skipping a treatment for cancer because of concerns about the risk of infection with COVID-19 is a serious decision and something that should be discussed with your oncologist.

source: cancer.net

Absolutely. The general public health recommendations issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) make good sense at any time, but more so during times such as the COVID-19 outbreak. You can find the CDC guidance here on its website.

source: cancer.net

Cancer is a serious condition that requires treatment. Regardless of the type of treatment, the best advice is to talk with your cancer care team about whether or not any modifications to your cancer treatment regimen are necessary. In the absence of any symptoms or signs of COVID-19 infection, continuing your cancer treatment is likely to be the best course of action.

source: cancer.net

There is no specific evidence to suggest that endocrine therapies can raise the risk for getting COVID-19 or having a more serious illness. Most endocrine therapies do not suppress the immune system.

source: cancer.net

If on active cancer treatment, then patients should contact their treating oncologist by phone and make any arrangements as needed. If not on active treatment, then cancer survivors should contact their primary care doctor by phone and make any arrangements as needed.

source: cancer.net

There are many factors to consider when making an important decision such as postponing cancer treatment in order to avoid a potential infection with COVID-19. Patients should talk with their treating oncologist about the risks of postponing treatment versus the potential benefit of decreasing their infection risk. Things to discuss include the goals of cancer treatment, the likelihood that the cancer will be controlled with the treatment being planned, the intensity and side effects of the cancer treatment, and the supportive care that is available to reduce the side effects of treatment.

source: cancer.net

There is evidence that flushing can occur at intervals of up to every 12 weeks with no increase in adverse events or harms. Speak with your oncology care team about the flushing schedule that is right for you and ask if you may be able to flush the port yourself should it become necessary.

source: cancer.net

In general, as recommended by the CDC, any clinic visits that can be postponed without risk to the patient should be postponed. This includes routine surveillance visits to detect cancer recurrence. In many cases, the recommended frequency of these visits is already considered a range (e.g. 3 to 6 months), so extending the time between evaluations may still be within the recommendations. If you develop a new symptom that might indicate cancer recurrence you should contact your cancer care team and not wait for the next scheduled evaluation.

source: cancer.net

The most important thing you can do is follow the public health guidance provided by the CDC and your state and local health departments, as mentioned in Q4.

Another way to help would be to consider participating in research studies such as the Beat19 study, the NCI COVID-19 in Cancer Patients Study (NCCAPS), or this study at Stanford. These are studies that nearly anyone can participate in and they seek to learn more about what happens before, during and after you have symptoms of COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

You should follow the recommendations of your care team and general recommendations for a healthy lifestyle. Do not use tobacco products, eat a well-balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, exercise regularly, get enough sleep and follow public health guidelines on social distancing and hand washing.

source: cancer.net

If you need to change providers you should arrange for copy or transfer of your medical records to your new provider. Transferring a complete set of records is most desirable, but certain parts of the record are particularly important, such as the pathology report that established your cancer diagnosis, reports of any surgeries or radiation treatment performed as part of your cancer treatment, a summary of any chemotherapy treatments administered, and the results of your most recent scans, x-rays, or other cancer evaluations.

source: cancer.net

Given current circumstances regarding availability of medical services and in the interest of patient safety, it may be necessary to forego some of the procedures and tests customarily done to establish the extent of spread of the cancer (stage). Patients should discuss with their oncologists what diagnostic and staging tests are likely to be most informative in developing an initial treatment plan and should prioritize obtaining those tests if possible.

source: cancer.net

We encourage second opinions but recognize they may be difficult to schedule at this time. If a second opinion can be obtained by telephone or telehealth consultation, then that should be considered a reasonable alternative to no second opinion at all.

source: cancer.net

Patients with comorbidities, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and diabetes, appear to be at particularly high risk of serious complications from COVID-19. Most reports have not described the extent to which these comorbidities were controlled by medication or lifestyle change at the time of onset of COVID-19 infection. It is reasonable to assume, however, that comorbidities that are well controlled by medication are less likely to predispose a person to severe complications from COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

ASCO is not aware of specific data relating current or former vaping to risk of COVID-19 or risk of complications from this illness. However, it is reasonable to assume that smoking, vaping, or other behaviors or exposures that cause lung injury might increase the risk of complications from COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

It is too soon to say what the long-term effects of COVID-19 will be. However, it is already clear that some patients develop complications in multiple organ systems, including neurological complications, kidney failure, heart attack or heart failure, and blood clots. These serious complications could have long-term consequences, but extended patient follow-up is needed to understand the long-term effects.

source: cancer.net

Antibody testing is just now becoming available. It tests whether a person has been exposed to the SARS-COV-2 virus. It is too soon to say whether a positive antibody test means that a person has any form of immunity to the novel coronavirus.

source: cancer.net

Many acute and chronic pulmonary infections can cause scarring, as can chronic lung inflammation from smoking, occupational exposure to dust or asbestos, or autoimmune disease. Whether scarring increases the risk of lung cancer is more likely related to the underlying cause of the scarring (for example, smoking or asbestos exposure) than to the scarring itself.

source: cancer.net

It is unclear how long a delay after the infection has resolved may be necessary before beginning or restarting cancer treatment. Treatment should not be resumed until the symptoms of COVID-19 have resolved and there is some certainty the virus is no longer present, specifically, a negative SARS-Cov-2 test, unless the cancer is rapidly progressing and the risk-benefit assessment favors proceeding with cancer treatment.

source: cancer.net

The term ‘immune compromised’ refers to individuals whose immune system is considered weaker, more impaired, or less robust than that of the average healthy adult. The primary role of the immune system is to help fight off infection. Individuals with compromised immune systems are at a higher risk of getting infections, including viral infections such as COVID-19. There are many reasons that a person might be immune compromised: health conditions such as cancer, diabetes, or heart disease, older age, or lifestyle choices such as smoking can all contribute to weakened immune systems. Patients with cancer may be at greater risk of being immune compromised depending on the type of cancer they have, the type of treatment they receive, other health conditions, and their age. The risk of being immune compromised is typically highest during the time of active cancer treatment, such as during treatment with chemotherapy. There is no specific test to determine if a person is immune compromised, although findings such as low white blood cell counts or low levels of antibodies (also called immunoglobulins) in the blood likely indicate an immune compromised state.

source: cancer.net

It appears that patients with cancer and survivors of cancer may be at higher risk of health complications from COVID-19. This is not surprising given that this group of individuals is often immune compromised. There is emerging evidence that patients with hematological malignancies, including leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, may be a greater risk of infection and complications than patients with other cancer diagnoses. There is also evidence that patients with progressing cancer when they are diagnosed with COVID-19 may be at higher risk of death or serious health complications compared with those with disease in remission.

source: cancer.net

To date, limited evidence is available to suggest that any cancer treatments raise your risk for getting COVID-19 any more or less than anyone else who is exposed to the virus. There is some evidence that patients with cancer may experience more serious COVID-19 infection if they acquire it, likely because cancer and cancer treatment can contribute to weakened immune systems which can then lead to a reduced ability to fight off infections. Emerging evidence suggests that patients with lung cancer who received chemotherapy within 3 months of a COVID-19 diagnosis are at higher risk of dying from the infection. Patients who are getting treatment for cancer also interact with the health care system more frequently than the general population, so more exposure in that setting may contribute to a higher risk of getting an infection, but that is not known with certainty at this point. Patients are advised to speak with their cancer care team about whether non-essential clinic visits can be skipped, re-scheduled, or conducted by telephone or videoconferencing. Keep in mind, however, that skipping a treatment for cancer because of concerns about the risk of infection with COVID-19 is a serious decision and something that should be discussed with your oncologist.

source: cancer.net

Absolutely. The general public health recommendations issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) make good sense at any time, but more so during times such as the COVID-19 outbreak. You can find the CDC guidance here on its website.

source: cancer.net

Cancer is a serious condition that requires treatment. Regardless of the type of treatment, the best advice is to talk with your cancer care team about whether or not any modifications to your cancer treatment regimen are necessary. In the absence of any symptoms or signs of COVID-19 infection, continuing your cancer treatment is likely to be the best course of action.

source: cancer.net

There is no specific evidence to suggest that endocrine therapies can raise the risk for getting COVID-19 or having a more serious illness. Most endocrine therapies do not suppress the immune system.

source: cancer.net

If on active cancer treatment, then patients should contact their treating oncologist by phone and make any arrangements as needed. If not on active treatment, then cancer survivors should contact their primary care doctor by phone and make any arrangements as needed.

source: cancer.net

There are many factors to consider when making an important decision such as postponing cancer treatment in order to avoid a potential infection with COVID-19. Patients should talk with their treating oncologist about the risks of postponing treatment versus the potential benefit of decreasing their infection risk. Things to discuss include the goals of cancer treatment, the likelihood that the cancer will be controlled with the treatment being planned, the intensity and side effects of the cancer treatment, and the supportive care that is available to reduce the side effects of treatment.

source: cancer.net

There is evidence that flushing can occur at intervals of up to every 12 weeks with no increase in adverse events or harms. Speak with your oncology care team about the flushing schedule that is right for you and ask if you may be able to flush the port yourself should it become necessary.

source: cancer.net

In general, as recommended by the CDC, any clinic visits that can be postponed without risk to the patient should be postponed. This includes routine surveillance visits to detect cancer recurrence. In many cases, the recommended frequency of these visits is already considered a range (e.g. 3 to 6 months), so extending the time between evaluations may still be within the recommendations. If you develop a new symptom that might indicate cancer recurrence you should contact your cancer care team and not wait for the next scheduled evaluation.

source: cancer.net

The most important thing you can do is follow the public health guidance provided by the CDC and your state and local health departments, as mentioned in Q4.

Another way to help would be to consider participating in research studies such as the Beat19 study, the NCI COVID-19 in Cancer Patients Study (NCCAPS), or this study at Stanford. These are studies that nearly anyone can participate in and they seek to learn more about what happens before, during and after you have symptoms of COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

You should follow the recommendations of your care team and general recommendations for a healthy lifestyle. Do not use tobacco products, eat a well-balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, exercise regularly, get enough sleep and follow public health guidelines on social distancing and hand washing.

source: cancer.net

If you need to change providers you should arrange for copy or transfer of your medical records to your new provider. Transferring a complete set of records is most desirable, but certain parts of the record are particularly important, such as the pathology report that established your cancer diagnosis, reports of any surgeries or radiation treatment performed as part of your cancer treatment, a summary of any chemotherapy treatments administered, and the results of your most recent scans, x-rays, or other cancer evaluations.

source: cancer.net

Given current circumstances regarding availability of medical services and in the interest of patient safety, it may be necessary to forego some of the procedures and tests customarily done to establish the extent of spread of the cancer (stage). Patients should discuss with their oncologists what diagnostic and staging tests are likely to be most informative in developing an initial treatment plan and should prioritize obtaining those tests if possible.

source: cancer.net

We encourage second opinions but recognize they may be difficult to schedule at this time. If a second opinion can be obtained by telephone or telehealth consultation, then that should be considered a reasonable alternative to no second opinion at all.

source: cancer.net

Patients with comorbidities, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and diabetes, appear to be at particularly high risk of serious complications from COVID-19. Most reports have not described the extent to which these comorbidities were controlled by medication or lifestyle change at the time of onset of COVID-19 infection. It is reasonable to assume, however, that comorbidities that are well controlled by medication are less likely to predispose a person to severe complications from COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

ASCO is not aware of specific data relating current or former vaping to risk of COVID-19 or risk of complications from this illness. However, it is reasonable to assume that smoking, vaping, or other behaviors or exposures that cause lung injury might increase the risk of complications from COVID-19.

source: cancer.net

It is too soon to say what the long-term effects of COVID-19 will be. However, it is already clear that some patients develop complications in multiple organ systems, including neurological complications, kidney failure, heart attack or heart failure, and blood clots. These serious complications could have long-term consequences, but extended patient follow-up is needed to understand the long-term effects.

source: cancer.net

Antibody testing is just now becoming available. It tests whether a person has been exposed to the SARS-COV-2 virus. It is too soon to say whether a positive antibody test means that a person has any form of immunity to the novel coronavirus.

source: cancer.net

Many acute and chronic pulmonary infections can cause scarring, as can chronic lung inflammation from smoking, occupational exposure to dust or asbestos, or autoimmune disease. Whether scarring increases the risk of lung cancer is more likely related to the underlying cause of the scarring (for example, smoking or asbestos exposure) than to the scarring itself.

source: cancer.net

It is unclear how long a delay after the infection has resolved may be necessary before beginning or restarting cancer treatment. Treatment should not be resumed until the symptoms of COVID-19 have resolved and there is some certainty the virus is no longer present, specifically, a negative SARS-Cov-2 test, unless the cancer is rapidly progressing and the risk-benefit assessment favors proceeding with cancer treatment.

source: cancer.net

Frequently Asked Questions

Radiation Therapy or radiotherapy is the delivery, either externally or internally, of radiation using ionizing radiation to treat cancer and other diseases.

The DNA in cancer cells are damaged keeping the cancer cells from growing and reproducing. The cancer cells die and the cancer shrinks.

It will feel like you are having an x-ray taken. However, possible unwanted side effects may occur. Your skin covering the area affected by radiation therapy may feel like a sunburn. You will need to protect this area from the sun.

Radiation delivered externally will not cause you to become radioactive. Internally delivered radiation through a radioactive implant may limit or restrict visiting time with certain people until the implant is removed. These would include pregnant women and small children. These precautions, if necessary, will be explained by your doctor or nurse.

It is possible that normal cells surrounding the cancer cells being treated may be damaged. You may experience side effects should this occur. The benefits of killing cancer cells usually outweigh the risk of side effects. Your radiation oncologist and your nurse will carefully monitor any side effects.

The type, dose and area of the body being treated with radiation will determine any possible side effects. There are ways to prevent or reduce potential side effects. Your doctor will explain these to you.

Fatigue and skin irritation at the treatment site are the most common side effects. Depending on the dosage and area of the body receiving treatment, other possible side effects may include:

  • If treatment is given to the mouth, throat or neck area, you may experience a sore mouth or throat.
  • If you are being treated in the lung area, you may produce excess mucus and may have a cough.
  • If you are being treated in the abdominal area, you may encounter mild nausea and/or diarrhea.

After 4 to 6 weeks following treatment, most side effects disappear. Long term, you may notice changes in the color and elasticity of the skin where the treatment was given.

There may be medications to counteract some side effects. Before you begin treatment, please discuss any concerns you have about side effects and possible ways to avoid or treat them with your radiation oncologist.

Unless they are being treated in the abdominal area, most patients do not experience any nausea. However, there are effective medicines to reduce or treat nausea, so if you experience nausea, please report it to your doctor as soon as possible.

Unless you are receiving radiation treatment on the head, the hair on your head will not fall out. Some hair loss can be expected in the location where the treatment is performed. You may lose the hair on your arm if that is where you receive radiation therapy, for instance.

Typically, daily treatments, or fractions, are delivered daily Monday through Friday over a 5 to 7 week period of time. You will not be treated on Saturday or Sunday. Each daily treatment takes about 15-30 minutes.

Doctors, known as radiation oncologists, specialize in radiation therapy. Your treatment will be prescribed by your radiation oncologist. The most appropriate method to deliver your treatment will be determined by team of other professionals who will work very closely with your radiation oncologist. Some of the healthcare professionals you may encounter are as follows:

  • Radiation physicists work closely with the doctor in planning your treatment. They are also responsible for maintaining all of the machines to assure that the proper dosage is being delivered.
  • Dosimetrists specialize in determining the radiation dose delivered pursuant to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues in accordance with your treatment plan.
  • Radiation therapists position you and make sure the linear accelerator delivers your treatment properly.
  • Radiation oncology nurses educate you and your family about your treatment plan, coordinate the plan, and manage any side effects you experience.

We always welcome friends and family; however, they will be asked to stay in the waiting room during your treatment. Patients only are allowed in the radiation controlled area when radiation is being administered per federal regulations. It is also respectful of others’ privacy.

Your normal routine, including work or leisure, may continue during radiation treatment. You should maintain a healthy diet and get plenty of sleep. If you get tired, take time to rest.

It would be a long-term health risk for radiation therapists to be in the room with you during treatment. They treat many patients each day and radiation effects accumulate. You will be under constant observation during the treatment. Video cameras and an intercom are in the treatment room, so the therapist can always see and hear you. You will be able to ask for assistance at any time. If you need help, the therapist will terminate the treatment immediately.

The types of brachytherapy administered here at Central Alabama Radiation Oncology are early stage breast cancer and gynecological cancers. Your oncologist will discuss this with you if this treatment is best for you.

Radiation Therapy or radiotherapy is the delivery, either externally or internally, of radiation using ionizing radiation to treat cancer and other diseases.

The DNA in cancer cells are damaged keeping the cancer cells from growing and reproducing. The cancer cells die and the cancer shrinks.

It will feel like you are having an x-ray taken. However, possible unwanted side effects may occur. Your skin covering the area affected by radiation therapy may feel like a sunburn. You will need to protect this area from the sun.

Radiation delivered externally will not cause you to become radioactive. Internally delivered radiation through a radioactive implant may limit or restrict visiting time with certain people until the implant is removed. These would include pregnant women and small children. These precautions, if necessary, will be explained by your doctor or nurse.

It is possible that normal cells surrounding the cancer cells being treated may be damaged. You may experience side effects should this occur. The benefits of killing cancer cells usually outweigh the risk of side effects. Your radiation oncologist and your nurse will carefully monitor any side effects.

The type, dose and area of the body being treated with radiation will determine any possible side effects. There are ways to prevent or reduce potential side effects. Your doctor will explain these to you.

Fatigue and skin irritation at the treatment site are the most common side effects. Depending on the dosage and area of the body receiving treatment, other possible side effects may include:

  • If treatment is given to the mouth, throat or neck area, you may experience a sore mouth or throat.
  • If you are being treated in the lung area, you may produce excess mucus and may have a cough.
  • If you are being treated in the abdominal area, you may encounter mild nausea and/or diarrhea.

After 4 to 6 weeks following treatment, most side effects disappear. Long term, you may notice changes in the color and elasticity of the skin where the treatment was given.

There may be medications to counteract some side effects. Before you begin treatment, please discuss any concerns you have about side effects and possible ways to avoid or treat them with your radiation oncologist.

Unless they are being treated in the abdominal area, most patients do not experience any nausea. However, there are effective medicines to reduce or treat nausea, so if you experience nausea, please report it to your doctor as soon as possible.

Unless you are receiving radiation treatment on the head, the hair on your head will not fall out. Some hair loss can be expected in the location where the treatment is performed. You may lose the hair on your arm if that is where you receive radiation therapy, for instance.

Typically, daily treatments, or fractions, are delivered daily Monday through Friday over a 5 to 7 week period of time. You will not be treated on Saturday or Sunday. Each daily treatment takes about 15-30 minutes.

Doctors, known as radiation oncologists, specialize in radiation therapy. Your treatment will be prescribed by your radiation oncologist. The most appropriate method to deliver your treatment will be determined by team of other professionals who will work very closely with your radiation oncologist. Some of the healthcare professionals you may encounter are as follows:

  • Radiation physicists work closely with the doctor in planning your treatment. They are also responsible for maintaining all of the machines to assure that the proper dosage is being delivered.
  • Dosimetrists specialize in determining the radiation dose delivered pursuant to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues in accordance with your treatment plan.
  • Radiation therapists position you and make sure the linear accelerator delivers your treatment properly.
  • Radiation oncology nurses educate you and your family about your treatment plan, coordinate the plan, and manage any side effects you experience.

We always welcome friends and family; however, they will be asked to stay in the waiting room during your treatment. Patients only are allowed in the radiation controlled area when radiation is being administered per federal regulations. It is also respectful of others’ privacy.

Your normal routine, including work or leisure, may continue during radiation treatment. You should maintain a healthy diet and get plenty of sleep. If you get tired, take time to rest.

It would be a long-term health risk for radiation therapists to be in the room with you during treatment. They treat many patients each day and radiation effects accumulate. You will be under constant observation during the treatment. Video cameras and an intercom are in the treatment room, so the therapist can always see and hear you. You will be able to ask for assistance at any time. If you need help, the therapist will terminate the treatment immediately.

The types of brachytherapy administered here at Central Alabama Radiation Oncology are early stage breast cancer and gynecological cancers. Your oncologist will discuss this with you if this treatment is best for you.

Cancer Types

Cancer Types

In the United States, more than 20,000 new cases of brain cancer are reported each year. Brain tumors are abnormal growths of cells in the brain. There are two types of brain cancer, primary and metastatic. Primary brain cancer originates in the brain and it occurs when one type of cell transforms from its normal characteristics. Once transformed, the cells grow and multiply in abnormal ways. As the abnormal cells grow, they become a mass or tumor. Metastatic brain cancer tumors are made from cancerous cells from a tumor located elsewhere in the body. This is the most common type of brain cancer.

At Central Alabama Radiation Oncology, we treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. A patient diagnosed with a brain tumor, whether the tumor is primary or metastatic, will have a custom made facemask to aid with their radiotherapy treatments. The mask has holes throughout it so that the patient can both see and breathe freely. The number of treatments a patient receives is dependent on the doctor’s review of their specific case.

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women; however male breast cancer is not uncommon and should be taken seriously. Breast cancer stages vary widely. The type of radiation therapy used to treat breast cancer also varies and depends, to a great extent, on the stage of cancer and whether surgery has been performed.

Breast cancer can be treated with two types of radiation – external beam radiation and Brachytherapy. Brachytherapy involves the implantation of radioactive material near the site of the cancer. Your radiation oncologist will counsel you on the most effective type of radiation therapy for your treatment.

A typical breast cancer patient will receive 33-36 treatments, depending on the doctor’s orders. The patient will have marks on their skin that will facilitate their radiation therapist with their daily setup. Furthermore, the patient will have a customized immobilization device to aid in the daily setup for their radiation treatments.

Head and Neck cancers start in the mouth, nose, throat, or sinus areas. They usually begin in the cells that make up the moist, thin tissues that line the inside of the mouth, nose and throat. Head and neck cancer does not include brain cancer.

The treatment for head and neck cancers vary and depend upon a number of factors such as exact location of the tumor, stage of the cancer and the patient’s age and general health. You and your physician will consider treatment options carefully and develop a radiation treatment plan.

Lung cancer occurs when cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner. There are two main types of lung cancer – small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, also called oat cell cancer) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Small-cell lung cancer accounts for approximately 10% – 15% of all cases of lung cancer.

Radiation therapy may be recommended for both SCLC and NSCLC, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy. A lung patient typically receives 36 treatments. The number of treatments depends on the doctor’s orders regarding the staging of the particular case. A lung patient will have a custom made treatment device molded around them placing their arms above their head to assist with their daily radiation therapy setup. The patient will have 3 marks on their skin that will be used for setup for their daily treatments.

Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among men. Your prostate cancer treatment options will be discussed thoroughly with your physician.

Treatment of prostate cancer with radiation can be delivered in two ways – external beam radiation delivered by one of Central Alabama Radiation Oncology’s state of the art machines; or internal radiation (brachytherapy) delivered through radioactive material placed into the affected area.

A prostate patient will receive between 39-45 treatments, depending on the doctor’s orders. The patient will have 3 marks on their skin that will be used for setup of daily treatments. To facilitate the treatment, prostate patients are asked to drink at least 16 oz. of water 30 minutes prior to receiving their daily treatment.

Other types of cancers that we treat at Central Alabama Radiation Oncology include skin, cervical, colorectal, bladder, kidney and ovarian, among others. More information on these types of cancers and their treatment can be found in the Helpful Links section.

In the United States, more than 20,000 new cases of brain cancer are reported each year. Brain tumors are abnormal growths of cells in the brain. There are two types of brain cancer, primary and metastatic. Primary brain cancer originates in the brain and it occurs when one type of cell transforms from its normal characteristics. Once transformed, the cells grow and multiply in abnormal ways. As the abnormal cells grow, they become a mass or tumor. Metastatic brain cancer tumors are made from cancerous cells from a tumor located elsewhere in the body. This is the most common type of brain cancer.

At Central Alabama Radiation Oncology, we treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. A patient diagnosed with a brain tumor, whether the tumor is primary or metastatic, will have a custom made facemask to aid with their radiotherapy treatments. The mask has holes throughout it so that the patient can both see and breathe freely. The number of treatments a patient receives is dependent on the doctor’s review of their specific case.

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women; however male breast cancer is not uncommon and should be taken seriously. Breast cancer stages vary widely. The type of radiation therapy used to treat breast cancer also varies and depends, to a great extent, on the stage of cancer and whether surgery has been performed.

Breast cancer can be treated with two types of radiation – external beam radiation and Brachytherapy. Brachytherapy involves the implantation of radioactive material near the site of the cancer. Your radiation oncologist will counsel you on the most effective type of radiation therapy for your treatment.

A typical breast cancer patient will receive 33-36 treatments, depending on the doctor’s orders. The patient will have marks on their skin that will facilitate their radiation therapist with their daily setup. Furthermore, the patient will have a customized immobilization device to aid in the daily setup for their radiation treatments.

Head and Neck cancers start in the mouth, nose, throat, or sinus areas. They usually begin in the cells that make up the moist, thin tissues that line the inside of the mouth, nose and throat. Head and neck cancer does not include brain cancer.

The treatment for head and neck cancers vary and depend upon a number of factors such as exact location of the tumor, stage of the cancer and the patient’s age and general health. You and your physician will consider treatment options carefully and develop a radiation treatment plan.

Lung cancer occurs when cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner. There are two main types of lung cancer – small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, also called oat cell cancer) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Small-cell lung cancer accounts for approximately 10% – 15% of all cases of lung cancer.

Radiation therapy may be recommended for both SCLC and NSCLC, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy. A lung patient typically receives 36 treatments. The number of treatments depends on the doctor’s orders regarding the staging of the particular case. A lung patient will have a custom made treatment device molded around them placing their arms above their head to assist with their daily radiation therapy setup. The patient will have 3 marks on their skin that will be used for setup for their daily treatments.

Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among men. Your prostate cancer treatment options will be discussed thoroughly with your physician.

Treatment of prostate cancer with radiation can be delivered in two ways – external beam radiation delivered by one of Central Alabama Radiation Oncology’s state of the art machines; or internal radiation (brachytherapy) delivered through radioactive material placed into the affected area.

A prostate patient will receive between 39-45 treatments, depending on the doctor’s orders. The patient will have 3 marks on their skin that will be used for setup of daily treatments. To facilitate the treatment, prostate patients are asked to drink at least 16 oz. of water 30 minutes prior to receiving their daily treatment.

Other types of cancers that we treat at Central Alabama Radiation Oncology include skin, cervical, colorectal, bladder, kidney and ovarian, among others. More information on these types of cancers and their treatment can be found in the Helpful Links section.
HIPAA/PRIVACY